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December 2007 Patient: Duke

Duke the Great Dane puppy first came to Midway when he was about 5 months old. He had been in an accident about two months prior and had broken both front legs. The owners could not afford surgery at that time so the primary treating veterinarian had placed casts on both limbs. The right side had healed fine but the left side had healed with a terrible angular deformity. Duke had been abandoned by his previous owners and he had been adopted by Mary. Her friend Joan had agreed to help finance the surgery to correct the problem but she could not afford the expense at a board certified orthopedic surgeon's office.

Dr. K.C. Nayfield discussed surgical options but highly advised referral. Mary and Joan elected to have him try to salvage the limb. The initial surgery involved removing a piece of the growing ulna and then a wedge of the radius. The two pieces of radius were rejoined using an external fixator. Over the next 6 weeks Duke healed the fracture of the radius nicely but also managed to span the defect in the ulna. With the ulna rejoined and not growing it created a worsening deformity in the radius.

The second surgery involved removing another portion of the ulna to allow the radius to grow more normally. Over the next 4 weeks Duke managed to join this area as well. The deformity was still severe and he was just barely using the leg. It was decided to wait until the growth plates in the bones had closed and reevaluate the leg.

At 9 months of age Duke went in for his third surgery. Dr. Nayfield removed another wedge of bone and placed a "T" shaped bone plate to the fracture. The final surgery was successful. Although Duke still has a mild deformity, he is walking and running without a limp. He lives with Mary on a farm in Ocala and enjoys cruising through the fields and playing with the other animals.

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